tonygrands.com

Hip Hop Culture for Grown-Ups

Are Hip Hop Reality Shows The New Rap Record Labels?

Words by Tony Grands

Sometimes, I let my wife handle the remote control. (No innuendo.) So last night, I was forced I watched T.I. (The Family Hustle) & Jim Jones (Chrissy & Mr. Jones) on VH1 with her.

Technically, we only watched the T.I. show, & that’s because it immediately followed Basketball Girlfriends Babymommas Golddiggers Wives of L.A., a show she loves but I passionately loathe (even though they are scantily clad 98% of the time & constantly find reasons to bend over). We tried to peep Jim & his soon-to-be ex-wife work out their marital problems on film, but 12 minutes into the show & the curiosity of the moment succumbed to the boredom of the product. Before I changed the channel, I mentioned to her that it’s ironic how Jim Jones is now more popular than his frienemy Cam. She didn’t even respond, much less say “Oh” or feign interest.

Not for anything in particular, but both shows – T.I. & Tiny & Jim Jones’ – respectively, reminded me of Run’s House, a show I watched religiously some summers back. Rappers with TV shows about their personal lives doesn’t seem like much, but it’s a hell of an accomplishment considering what & where rap has matured from.

T.I., whose music I’ve never been a big fan of, does a good job of becoming the antithesis of what America wants the world to believe all Black men are. In fact, in comparison to a lot of shows, T.I.’s exudes very little genuine ignorance. The small amounts that do exist are usually subliminal jokes he cracks or cliff-hanging half-sentences. It’s very organic. Or as my wife would say, “cute.” Jim’s show, on the other hand, is an intimate look at him attempting to reconcile his bruised & stressed marriage with his frustrated wife. Definitely NOT what you & the homies would blow any medical to whilst viewing. Truth be told, it’s kind of boring. No shots, just observation. I absolutely commend these dudes, including The Game for his upcoming reality show about him marrying his longtime girlfriend.

It takes a lot of heart, & balls as big as boulders, to invite the world into your privitized space. & while some of you may mumble about how much money they get paid to do such so-called reality shows, understand that no price is larger than a man’s peace of mind & physical freedom. You can have the nicest, flyest cars in the world, but what’s the use if every time you drive one, it gets mobbed & attacked & photographed?

Not for nothing, but I think the lovely people who brought us the instant urban classic film “Snow On Tha Bluff” (or someone like the Hughes brothers) should do some reality shows following rappers. Not just any rappers, though, but rappers who live what they talk about. In 2012, finding cats who keep it real is as easy as logging on to everyone’s favorite Hip Hop website, picking a video clip at random, & following or friending them online. That’s the rapper that people want to see once a week on their unnecessarily huge flat screen tv’s. A reality show with a “real” rapper would contain blurred faces, gratuitous bleeping, & real time criminal activity, all of which would equal dollars to the executives & endless entertainment for everyone else.

Eventually, the “Love & Hip Hop’s” will be replaced with shows that follow the likes of Chief Keef or Gucci Mane or Waka Flocka Flame around their respective, collective ‘hoods. It’ll be tantamount to when record labels realized how much money could be made hiring young, Black males to write bouncy genocidal anthems & literal murder music. All that’s left to ponder at this point is why no one has put it into action yet.

Words by Tony Grands
@TheTonyGrands

Technically, we only watched the T.I. show, & that’s because it immediately followed Basketball Girlfriends Babymommas Golddiggers Wives of L.A., a show she loves but I passionately loathe (even though they are scantily clad 98% of the time & constantly find reasons to bend over). We tried to peep Jim & his soon-to-be ex-wife work out their marital problems on film, but 12 minutes into the show & the curiosity of the moment succumbed to the boredom of the product. Before I changed the channel, I mentioned to her that it’s ironic how Jim Jones is now more popular than his frienemy Cam. She didn’t even respond, much less say “Oh” or feign interest.

Not for anything in particular, but both shows – T.I. & Tiny & Jim Jones’ – respectively, reminded me of Run’s House, a show I watched religiously some summers back. Rappers with TV shows about their personal lives doesn’t seem like much, but it’s a hell of an accomplishment considering what & where rap has matured from.

T.I., whose music I’ve never been a big fan of, does a good job of becoming the antithesis of what America wants the world to believe all Black men are. In fact, in comparison to a lot of shows, T.I.’s exudes very little genuine ignorance. The small amounts that do exist are usually subliminal jokes he cracks or cliff-hanging half-sentences. It’s very organic. Or as my wife would say, “cute.” Jim’s show, on the other hand, is an intimate look at him attempting to reconcile his bruised & stressed marriage with his frustrated wife. Definitely NOT what you & the homies would blow any medical to whilst viewing. Truth be told, it’s kind of boring. No shots, just observation. I absolutely commend these dudes, including The Game for his upcoming reality show about him marrying his longtime girlfriend.

It takes a lot of heart, & balls as big as boulders, to invite the world into your privitized space. & while some of you may mumble about how much money they get paid to do such so-called reality shows, understand that no price is larger than a man’s peace of mind & physical freedom. You can have the nicest, flyest cars in the world, but what’s the use if every time you drive one, it gets mobbed & attacked & photographed?

Not for nothing, but I think the lovely people who brought us the instant urban classic film “Snow On Tha Bluff” (or someone like the Hughes brothers) should do some reality shows following rappers. Not just any rappers, though, but rappers who live what they talk about. In 2012, finding cats who keep it real is as easy as logging on to everyone’s favorite Hip Hop website, picking a video clip at random, & following or friending them online. That’s the rapper that people want to see once a week on their unnecessarily huge flat screen tv’s. A reality show with a “real” rapper would contain blurred faces, gratuitous bleeping, & real time criminal activity, all of which would equal dollars to the executives & endless entertainment for everyone else.

Eventually, the “Love & Hip Hop’s” will be replaced with shows that follow the likes of Chief Keef or Gucci Mane or Waka Flocka Flame around their respective, collective ‘hoods. It’ll be tantamount to when record labels realized how much money could be made hiring young, Black males to write bouncy genocidal anthems & literal murder music. All that’s left to ponder at this point is why no one has put it into action yet.

Words by Tony Grands
@TheTonyGrands

Advertisements

4 comments on “Are Hip Hop Reality Shows The New Rap Record Labels?

  1. eazy_ (@black_253)
    November 13, 2012

    Keep it real rapper show, put it on HBO and I am all for it.

    I like watching TI interact with his family. I am a dad. Money is not important until there is not enough.

    Jim Jones is boring because they aren’t happy. If I wanted to experience a bad relationship I would turn the TV off and speak to my wife. Just kidding.

    Like

    • Tony Grands
      November 13, 2012

      If I wanted to experience a bad relationship I would turn the TV off and speak to my wife. Just kidding.

      ^
      Bruh. LOL

      Like

  2. markdub7
    November 13, 2012

    Ti’s show certainly paints him in a far more favorable light than any of his music to date. He is a proud family man, and actually not a bad image to be projected to those who are ignorant of black America.

    Like

    • eazy_ (@black_253)
      November 13, 2012

      Speaking of favorable lights, I gave his mixtape 11 Months and One Day a listen. It was strange because I didn’t realize I only thought of him within the confines of the show these days. It seems it would be tough to explain that image and lyrics to the kids.

      Like

Comments, Questions, Or Criticism?

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

DMCA DISCLAIMER:

We do not support online piracy nor do we claim ownership of any photos unless otherwise specified. If any copyrighted/protected content is published, please contact us at tgdcmailbox@gmail.com for immediate removal. Thank you. Have a great day.

Home of the TGR Podcast and new music. Click here to follow.

TonyGrandsTV. Honest, original entertainment. Click to subscribe.

Can't Tune In On Mondays? No Worries. Click The Logo To Catch Up On Every Segment Of Manhood Mondays

Tony Grands @ BadCulture.net! Follow his articles by CLICKING HERE.

WE NEED YOUR HELP TO KEEP GOING! ANY AMOUNT OF LOVE IS APPRECIATED! PLEASE CONSIDER MAKING A SMALL DONATION.

Member of The Internet Defense League

%d bloggers like this: